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Vibrant musical styles gradually change over time and in 1917 Ragtime was becoming Jazz. It was in this year that the first records labeled as Jazz began making their way into stores in the United States. The general record buying public was probably unaware that this style of music was not that new in 1917. The music that would become known as Jazz had been played in New Orleans and other other parts of the South for many years by bands lead by musicians such as Buddy Bolden, Frankie Dusen, Jack Laine and others.

The Creole Band is generally considered to be the first band from New Orleans that was playing this style of music to tour outside of the South. They performed on the vaudeville circuit in the United States from 1914 to 1918. San Francisco bandleader Bert Kelly would later claim to have been playing Jazz as early as 1914 in San Francisco and then in Chicago in 1915. Both Brown's Dixieland Jass Band and Stein's Dixieland Jass Band were performing and billing themselves as "Jass" bands in Chicago in 1916. But none of these bands had recorded until 1917 and some of them never would make records.

The standard history of Jazz generally considers the first Jazz record to have been the Original Dixieland 'Jass' Band's "Dixie Jass Band One Step" and "Livery Stable Blues." This record was made for the Victor label in New York on February 26, 1917. The record was released in May of 1917. It was an immediate success and this record is considered the spark that ignited the Jazz fad that seized the world in the years during and after World War I. The Original Dixieland Jass Band was a group of White musicians from New Orleans. All of the band's members had played in Papa Jack Laine's Reliance Brass Band at one time or another before leaving New Orleans in 1916. The band went north to play in Chicago under the name of Stein's Dixieland Jass Band at Schiller's Cafe on 31st Street. After a heated disagreement with Stein the rest of the band quit and took the job at the Del' Abe Cafe at the Hotel Normandy at Clark and Randolph Street calling themselves the Original Dixieland Jass Band. The band moved on to the Casino Gardens on North Clark and Kinzie Street. The Casino Gardens was a popular hangout for people involved in show business. It was here that the famous vaudeville singer Al Jolson first heard the band and recommended them to a theatrical agent. The agent set the band up with an engagement in New York City at Reisenweber's Restaurant on Columbus Circle at Broadway which began on January 15th, 1917. The group was a great success in New York and continued to be quite popular until the band left for England in March of 1919.

So goes the standard history of Jazz, but the reality is that the Original Dixieland Jass Band's first record was not the first recording released that referred to Jazz in the song title or where the band was labeled as a Jass band on the record label. A rather convincing argument can be made that Collins and Harlan's Edison disc and cylinder "That Funny Jas Band From Dixieland" was in fact the first Jazz recording. This tune was issued on an Edison Blue Amberol wax cylinder in April of 1917 and on an Edison record in July of that year. Collins and Harlan re-recorded another version of the tune in January of 1917 and it was released on the Victor label a month before the Original Dixieland Jass Band's first record. The instrumental breaks on the Edison version of "That Funny Jas Band From Dixieland" are quite exciting and are most certainly in the Jazz style. The Victor version of "That Funny Jas Band From Dixieland" isn't as jazzy as the Edison version, but is still an interesting recording. The song was written in 1916 by Henry L. Marshall, a Chicago based songwriter. It is likely that the lyrics of the song are referring to the Original Dixieland Jass Band, Brown's Dixieland Jass Band or Stein's Dixieland Jass Band because all of these bands were performing in Chicago during that period. Arthur Collins and Byron G. Harlan were one of the most successful of all early recording acts. They were singers of character songs who often sang and talked on record in African-American dialects. Their first record was released in 1902 and they specialized in comedy, coon songs and Ragtime throughout their long and successful recording career. Arthur Collins would record several additional solo records in 1917 that mentioned Jazz or Jass in the title, "Ephraham's Jazzbo Band" in January, "Everybody Loves a 'Jass' Band" and "Keep Jazzin' It, Ras" on the Emerson label and "Everybody Loves a Jazz Band" appeared again on the Columbia label in March and "Ephraham's Jasbo Band" the following month on Emerson and "Get A Jazz Band To Jazz The Yankee Doodle Tune" in October, and "Everybody Loves a Jazz Band" appeared once again in November on the rare Cresent label.

A minstrel performer by the name of George H. O'Connor recorded a song called "Ephraham's Jazbo Band" on February 10th. O'Connor was White and performed in blackface. It is interesting to note that O'Connor was also a successful lawyer but continued to do his minstrel act on the side. He later became known as the "Troubadour to the Presidents" because he had performed for seven of them, from Taft to Truman.

Borbee's "Jass" Orchestra recorded two songs "It's A Long, Long Time" and "Just The Kind Of Girl You'd Love To Make Your Wife" on February 14, 1917 but this record was not released until July of 1917 after the success of the Original Dixieland Jass Band's record. Apparently the record was to be released under the name of Borbee's Tango Orchestra but the band's name was changed from "Tango" to "Jass" to take advantage of the success of the Original Dixieland Jass Band and the Jazz craze that they had spawned in New York. The band returned to the studio in August and recorded two additional songs "Paddle-Addle" and "The Ragtime Volunteers Are Off To War" Other than the Borbee's "Jass" Orchestra name, there was nothing "jazzy" about these records. These were pretty much standard dance records of that period and shouldn't be considered further in our discussion of the first Jazz records.

The next song to be recorded with the word "Jass in the title was Arthur Fields' "Everybody Loves A 'Jass' Band". This tune was recorded on March 15, 1917 and released in July of that year. The Edison paper disc jacket that came with this record stated,

"Do you love a 'Jass' band? Doubtless you would if you knew what one was. You'll know all about it when you have heard this song. 'Jass' bands are all the rage this year in the 'Lobster Palaces' along Broadway."

Fields was a White vaudeville performer. In 1919 Fields made three records with Ford Dabney's Band.

Irving Kaufman was a prolific recording artist and vaudeville performer. During the course of his career he was tapped to supply the vocal choruses on many early jazz and dance band records by several record companies. In 1917 he was the first to record Irving Berlin's new song "Mr. Jazz Himself"

The first African-American band to release records that indicated that the band was playing "Jass" was Wilbur Sweatman's and his Jass Band. In April of 1917 Sweatman's band recorded seven instrumentals for the Pathe label. The songs are still firmly planted in the Ragtime tradition but there are some slightly "jazzy" clarinet and saxophone effects scattered throughout the songs. Sweatman's later records that were recorded between 1918 and 1920 for the Columbia and Little Wonder labels are quite a bit "jazzier".

Charles Prince's Band recorded several songs in 1917 that included the word "Jazz" rather than "Jass" or "Jas". The first song was recorded on April 16th was "Hong Kong" which was subtitled a "Jazz One-Step". In June several different sessions produced "Everybody's Jazzin' It", "New Orleans Jazz" and "Yah-De-Dah". "Yah-De-Dah" was recorded by both Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band and the Frisco Jass Band. Prince's band first started recording in 1902 and was one of the most prolific bands of the accoustic recording era. . In July Prince recorded "Lily Of The Valley" which was labeled a Jazz One-step and Irving Berlin's song "Mr. Jazz Himself" in August. His final recording of 1917 labeled as Jazz was "Cleopatra Had A Jazz Band" which was recorded December 15th.

The famous vaudeville all-saxophone sextette the Six Brown Brothers made a record for Victor on May 9th of 1917 that was labeled "Smiles And Chuckles - A Jazz Rag". The song was still very much in the Ragtime style and really wasn't very "jazzy" at all. The Six Brown Brothers would go on to record a couple of other tunes labeled as jazz in 1920 but their role in the history of jazz was minimal. Their greatest contribution being the popularization of the saxophone.

The Frisco "Jass" Band was formed in early 1917 and included saxophonist Rudy Wiedoeft who had just arrived in New York City from California. Their first record Johnson's "Jass" Blues and Canary Cottage were fairly "jazzy" in style as are the records that they recorded in July and August of 1917. Cute Little Wigglin' Dance and That's It were the "jazziest" on the records. The paper sleeve that accompanied the Frisco "Jass" Band's Pozzo (Edison 50464) had this to say about the jazz fad that was sweeping New York;

"Just how the Jazz Band originated and where it came from is very hard to say. It hit New York during the winter of 1916-17 and once it got on Broadway it stuck. It is there yet and none of the great "Tango Palaces" can be considered complete without it. Frisco's Jazz Band is as "jazzy" as they come. It is the newest and smartest thing in "modern" music. If you have never danced to a "jazz" you have a real treat in store. make your debut with this record; you couldn't find a better one. "

Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band which featured Ted Lewis on clarinet made their first record on June 4th of 1917 Slippery Hank and Yah-De-Dah. Slippery Hank is absolutely manic in it's pace and instrumentation. This is easily the hottest record released during the first year of recorded Jazz. Records released under the name of Earl Fuller's Rector Novelty Orchestra in 1917 are not of much Jazz interest. Ted Lewis went solo in 1919 and would become one of the best selling and most popular musicians of the 1920s and 1930s.

Marion Harris a rising star of vaudeville and musical theatre joined the Jazz fad on July 18th, 1917 with her version of the tune "When I Hear That Jazz Band Play". The song was another "instructional" record similar to Collins' and Harlan's "That Funny Jas Band From Dixieland". The lyrics of the song attempt to explain what Jazz is and how you were supposed to behave when you've heard some Jazz. The song was the closing number of Ziegfeld's Midnight Frolic in 1917. Some Jazz historians consider Marion Harris to be the first female Jazz singer to record. She continued to perform and record Jazz and Blues tunes throughout her career.

W.C. Handy's Orchestra of Memphis jumped on the Jazz bandwagon in September of 1917 by recording ten songs for Columbia including their cover version of Livery Stable Blues the Original Dixieland 'Jass' Band's big hit record. Handy was forty-three years old when these records were made. If you consider Wilbur Sweatman's and his Jass Band records of 1917 to be Ragtime stylistically and not Jazz then you could safely say that Handy's records were the first Jazz recordings made by an African-American band. Only the song That "Jazz" Dance (The Jazz Dance Everybody Is Crazy 'Bout) was labeled as jazz but I've included Handy's version Livery Stable Blues on this list for obvious reasons. W.C. Handy's association with Jazz after 1917 was primarily as a songwriter. His songs such as the "St. Louis Blues" and "Memphis Blues" would become part of the standard repertoire of jazz.

Ford Dabney was another African-American bandleader that recorded songs in 1917 that could be considered Jazz. Dabney's Band made their first records in August of 1917. At the time that these recordings were made Dabney's Band was featured in Ziegfeld's Midnight Frolic, a musical revue that played at the New Amsterdam Roof atop the New Amsterdam Theatre (214 W. 42nd Street at Broadway) in New York. The show began at 11:30 PM and featured dance music between the acts. "The Jass - "Lazy Blues"" was the only one of his 1917 records to be labeled as "Jass", but Dabney recorded several of the same songs that appeared on the records of other Jazz artists that recorded in 1917.

The first record where both sides song titles contained the word Jazz was Columbia A2472. Sam Ash alerted us that Cleopatra Had A Jazz Band. Ash was a vaudeville performer and star of Broadway musicals during the 1910s and 1920s. He is best remembered today for the string of music stores that still bear his name.

On the flip side of this record was a song by vaudeville star Gene Greene, "The Ragtime King". Greene accurately predicted the future of American popular music by informing us that Alexander no longer played Ragtime with his rendition of Alexander's Got A Jazz Band Now. Some Jazz historians consider Greene's 1911 song "King of the Bungaloos" to be the first example of scat singing on record. He re-recorded this song once for Emerson in December of 1916 and twice in 1917 for Victor and for Little Wonder. It is true that Greene recorded improvised vocals on many of his records starting in 1911 but it is not an easy fit to tie him stylistically to the legions of jazz vocalists that became known as scat singers in the years that followed.

Edison recording artist Eugene Jauda's Society Orchestra recorded "The "Jass" One-Step". There is nothing particularly "jazzy" about the song other than the title. Jaudas was the musical director at Edison.

Yerkes' Jazarimba Orchestra was a series of recording sessions under the direction of band booker Harry Yerkes. The sessions featured George Hamilton Green and his brother Joe Green on marimbas and xylophones. In September of 1917 the group recorded their first five records for the Columbia and Gennett labels.

Discographers at first attributted Blake's Jazzone Orchestra's recording of "The Jazz Dance" and Morse and Frankel's recording of "Jazzing Around" to the pianist Eubie Blake. It is now believed that Eubie Blake had nothing to do with these records. Blake's Jazzone Orchestra's is thought to have been a band from Richmond, Virginia and "Jazzing Around" was incorrectly listed in discographies as being recorded by the Eubie Blake Trio.

The remaining bands that recorded songs in 1917 that included some form of the word "Jazz" in the song title or band name were anonymous studio groups. The Memphis Pickaninny Band recorded Some Jazz Blues. The Emerson Military Band recorded two versions of Hong Kong "Jazz" One-Step and a version of Yah De Dah (A "Jazz Fox Trot"), the Emerson Symphony Orchestra recorded Hawaiian Butterfly "Jazz"Foxtrot.

Although some of these performer's association with jazz ended in 1917, the majority of the performers listed here were able to sustain careers once the initial jazz fad had passed. Of all the groups and individuals who recorded the first jazz records the Original Dixieland Jass Band has proved to have had the most lasting impact on the history of the music. W.C. Handy's songs have enjoyed the greatest popularity over the years and Ted Lewis was the most popular and successful of all the artists who first recorded jazz in 1917. Over the years Lewis' bands featured many musicians who would later go on to be the future stars of jazz such as Muggsy Spanier, Jimmy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, George Brunies and Jack Teagarden. Wilbur Sweatman also employed several up and coming jazz musicians early in their careers such as Duke Ellington, Sonny Greer, Otto Hardwick, Cozy Cole and Coleman Hawkins.

The question of who did what first and what was ragtime and what was jazz is often a divisive question among those who are interested in early jazz. I hope that this list of songs that were labeled as jazz in 1917 will help all who listen to them to form a better understanding of the first recordings of the style of music that has come to be known as jazz.

I was inspired to write this article after reading Tim Gracyk's "Jass" in 1916-1917 and Tin Pan Alley. I would also like to thank Dan Cassidy for his illuminating look into the etymology of the word jazz, Bruce Vermazen, Uncle Dave Lewis, Dr. Rainer Lotz, and MAC of the Antique Phonograph Hour on WFMU for their the help with this article. Corrections and additions are welcome.

Title Artist Recording Date Company
That Funny Jas Band From Dixieland
(Henry L. Marshall)
Collins and Harlan 12-1-1916 Edison 50423,
Blue Amberol 3140
Ephraham's Jazzbo Band
(James Brockman)
Arthur Collins 1-1917 Emerson
7140
That Funny Jas Band From Dixieland
(Gus Kahn / Henry L. Marshall)
Collins and Harlan 1-12-1917 Victor
18235-B
It's A Long, Long Time
(Josephine Vail)
Borbee's "Jass" Orchestra 2-14-1917 Columbia
A2233
Just The Kind Of Girl You'd Love To Make Your Wife
(Harry Von Tilzer)
Borbee's "Jass" Orchestra 2-14-1917 Columbia
A2233
Ephraham's Jazbo Band
(James Brockman / Smith)
George H. O'Connor 2-10-1917 Columbia
A2211
Everybody Loves a Jazz Band
(Leon Flatow)
Arthur Fields 3-1917 Columbia
A2211
Keep Jazzin' It, Ras Arthur Collins 3-1917 Emerson
7385
Dixieland Jass Band One-Step
Introducing "That Teasin' Rag"
Original Dixieland 'Jass' Band 2-26-1917 Victor
18255-A
Livery Stable Blues
(Compossed and played by Original Dixieland 'Jass' Band)
Original Dixieland 'Jass' Band 2-26-1917 Victor
18255-B
Everybody Loves a 'Jass' Band
(Leon Flatow)
Arthur Fields 3-15-1917 Edison 50439
Blue Amberol 3197
A Bag Of Rags
(W.R. McKanlass)
Wilbur Sweatman and His Jass Band 4-1917 Pathe
20167
Boogie Rag
(Wilbur Sweatman)
Wilbur Sweatman and His Jass Band 4-1917 Pathe
20147
Dance And Grow Thin
(Irving Berlin / George W. Meyer)
Wilbur Sweatman and His Jass Band 4-1917 Pathe
20147
Dancing An American Rag
(Bob Ward)
Wilbur Sweatman and His Jass Band 4-1917 Pathe
20145 B
I Wonder Why
From "Love O' Mike"

(Jerome Kern)
Wilbur Sweatman's and His Jass Band 4-1917 Pathe
20145 A
Joe Turner Blues
(W.C. Handy)
Wilbur Sweatman's and His Jass Band 4-1917 Pathe
20167
Ephraham's Jasbo Band
(James Brockman)
Arthur Collins 4-1917 Par-o-ket 84
Emerson 7140
Ephraham's Jazbo Band
(James Brockman)
Arthur Collins 4-1917 Emerson
5176
Hong Kong
(A "Jazz One-Step")

(Under the Direction of G. Hepburn Wilson)

(Hans Von Holstein / Alma M. Sanders)
Prince's Band 4-6-1917 Columbia
A5967
Hong Kong
"Jazz" One-Step

(Hans Von Holstein / Alma M. Sanders)
Emerson
Military Band
5-1917 Emerson
7204
Hawaiian Butterfly
"Jazz"Foxtrot

(Billy Baskette / Joseph Santly / George A. Little)
Emerson
Symphony Orchestra
5-1917 Emerson
7204
Smiles And Chuckles
(Jazz Rag)
(In One-Step Tempo)

(F. Henri Klickmann)
Six Brown Brothers 5-9-1917 Victor
18365-A
Canary Cottage
(Earl Carroll)
Frisco Jass Band 5-10-1917 Edison
50440
Blue Amberol 3241
Johnson's "Jass" Blues
(Arnold Johnson)
Frisco Jass Band 5-10-1917 Edison
50470
Blue Amberol 3254
Everybody's Jazzin' It
(Lew Hays)
Prince's Band 5-11-1917 Columbia
A2286
Everybody's Jazzing It
(Will J. Hart / Lew Hays)
Collins And Harlan 5-22-1917 Victor
18303-B
Darktown Strutters Ball
(Shelton Brooks)
Original Dixieland Jass Band 5-31-1917 Columbia
A2297
Indiana
(James F. Hanley)
Original Dixieland Jass Band 5-31-1917 Columbia
A2297
Night-Time In Little Italy
(Fred Fischer / Joe McCarthy)
Frisco Jass Band 6-4-1917 Edison
50515
Blue Amberol 3286
Pozzo
(Vincent Rose)
Frisco Jass Band 6-4-1917 Edison
50464
Blue Amberol 3303
Slippery Hank
(F.H. Losey)
Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band 6-4-1917 Victor
18321-A
Yah-De-Dah
(Mel B. Kaufman)
Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band 6-4-1917 Victor
18321-A
Everybody's Jazzin' It
(Introducing: The Honolulu Hicki Boola Boo)

(Hays / Von Tilzer)
Prince's Band 6-9-1917 Columbia
A2347
Some Jazz Blues
(M.L. Lake)
Memphis Pickaninny Band 6-1917 Pathe Freres 20236
New Orleans Jazz
(Richardson)
Prince's Band 6-22-1917 Columbia
A5983
Mr. Jazz Himself
(Irving Berlin)
Irving Kaufman 7-1917 Columbia
A2460
Lily Of The Valley Jazz One-Step
(Introducing: "Pollyanna", My Golden Prairie)

(Anatol Friedland / Franklin / Lee)
Prince's Band 7-11-1917 Columbia
A2327
When I Hear That Jazz Band Play
(From Ziegfeld's "Midnight Frolic")

(Gene Buck / Dave Stamper)
Marion Harris 7-18-1917 Victor
18398-B
Yah-De-Dah
(Mel. B. Kaufman)
Frisco Jass Band 7-26-1917 Edison
51081
Blue Amberol 3337
The "Jass" One-Step
(Hans Von Holstein / Alma Sanders)
Jaudas' Society Orchestra 8-1917 Edison
Blue Amberol 3228
All I Need Is Just A Girl Like You
(Abe Olman / Addison Burkhardt)
Frisco Jass Band 8-2-1917 Edison
51081
Blue Amberol 3390
Cute Little Wigglin' Dance
(H. Creamer / Turner Layton)
Frisco Jass Band 8-2-1917 Blue Amberol 3364
That's It
(H. Creamer / Turner Layton)
Frisco Jass Band 8-2-1917 Edison
50950
Blue Amberol 3418
Umbrellas To Mend
(Mel B. Kaufman)
Frisco Jass Band 8-2-1917 Edison
50470
Blue Amberol 3485
Mr. Jazz Himself
(Irving Berlin)
Prince's Band 8-18-1917 Columbia
A2370
Beale Street Blues
(W.C. Handy)
Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band 8-13-1917 Victor
18369-B
Old Grey Mare
(arranged by Frank Panella)
Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band 8-13-1917 Victor
18369-A
Barnyard Blues
(Original Dixieland Jazz Band)
Original Dixieland Jazz Band 8-7-1917 Aeolian Vocalion 1205
Ostrich Walk
(Larry Shields / Nick LaRocca)
Original Dixieland Jazz Band 8-7-1917 Aeolian Vocalion 1206
Tiger Rag
(Nick LaRocca)
Original Dixieland Jazz Band 8-7-1917 Aeolian Vocalion 1206
Paddle-Addle
(Ted Snyder)
Borbee's Jass Orchestra 8-17-1917 Columbia
A2363
The Ragtime Volunteers Are Off To War
(James F. Hanley)
Borbee's Jass Orchestra 8-17-1917 Columbia
A2363
Jazzing Around
(Earl Fuller)
Morse and Frankel 6-1917 Pathe Freres 20430-B
At The Jass Band Ball
(Larry Shields /Nick LaRocca)
Original Dixieland Jazz Band 9-3-1917 Aeolian Vocalion 1205
Coon Band Contest
(Arthur Pryor)
Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band 9-10-1917 Victor
18394-B
Li'l Liza Jane
(Countess Ada de Lachau / arranged by J.L. Burbeck)
Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band 9-10-1917 Victor
18394-A
Livery Stable Blues
(Yellow Nuņez / Ray Lopez)
Handy's Orchestra of Memphis 9-25-1917 Columbia
A2419
Columbia
2912
Happy Sammies
(Leo Deval)
Yerkes Jazarimba Orchestra 9-21-1917 Columbia
A2482
That's It
(Henry Creamer / J. Turner Layton)
Yerkes Jazarimba Orchestra 9-21-1917 Columbia
A2482
Columbia
2909
That "Jazz" Dance
(The Jazz Dance Everybody Is Crazy 'Bout)

(W. Benton Overstreet)
Handy's Orchestra of Memphis 9-22-1917 Columbia
A2419
Columbia
2912
Spanish Beauties
(Lopez)
Yerkes Jazarimba Orchestra 9-1917 Gennett
10020-A
A Bunch Of Roses Yerkes Jazarimba Orchestra 9-1917 Gennett
10020-A
Over There
(George M. Cohan)
Yerkes Jazarimba Orchestra 9-1917 Gennett
7613-A
Spanish Beauties
(Lopez)
Yerkes Jazarimba Orchestra 9-1917 Gennett
10020-A
Get A Jazz Band To Jazz The Yankee Doodle Tune
(Chris Smith)
Arthur Collins 10-1917 Emerson
7222
The Jazz Dance
(W. Benton Overstreet)
Blake's Jazzone Orchestra 11-1917 Pathe Freres 20430-A
Pathe 5108
Empire 6269
The Jass - "Lazy Blues"
(Ted Eastwood)
Dabney's Band 11-1917 Aeolian Vocalion 1218
Yah De Dah
(A "Jazz Fox Trot")

(Mel Kaufman)
Emerson
Military Band
11-1917 Emerson
7295
Yah De Dah
(A "Jazz Fox Trot")

(Mel Kaufman)
Emerson
Military Band
11-1917 Emerson
902
That Funny Jazz Band From Dixieland
(Henry L. Marshall)
Authur Collins 11-1917 Cresent
c10044
Alexander's Got A Jazz Band Now
(Chris Schonber / Jack Coogan)
Gene Greene 11-9-1917 Columbia
A2472
Cleopatra Had A Jazz Band
(Jack Coogan)
Sam Ash 11-9-1917 Columbia
A2472
Look At 'Em Doing It Now
(Larry Shields)
Original Dixieland Jazz Band 11-21-1917 Aeolian Vocalion
Oriental Jazz
(Dinwitty)
Original Dixieland Jazz Band 11-24-1917 Aeolian Vocalion 1242
Reisenweber Rag
(Original Dixieland Jazz Band)
Original Dixieland Jazz Band 11-24-1917 Aeolian Vocalion 1242
Cleopatra Had A Jazz Band
(Jimmy Morgan / Jack Coogan)
Prince's Band 12-15-1917 Columbia
A6017
Wild Jazz Knight - Jass One Step
(Louis Reinhard)
Prince's Band 1917 Little Wonder
712